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06 March 2011

It's Hard to Be Humble...

In the weekend meeting with our fellow believers today we'll be looking at Philippians 2:3-4:

Don’t be selfish; don’t try to impress others. Be humble, thinking of others as better than yourselves. Don’t look out only for your own interests, but take an interest in others, too. (NLT)

Now, we can't just take those two verses and build doctrine on them. There are other words surrounding these, and they give us the purpose behind the instruction above, but this phrase really sticks out at me:

Be humble, thinking of others as better than yourselves.
It's striking to me that even after following Jesus closely, listening to Him teach, watching Him love people and give to them, the apostles had an argument about which of them was better than the others (Luke 9:46-48). Matter of fact, on another occasion (Matthew 20:20-28), James and John got their mom to ask Jesus if they could sit in special places when Jesus established His kingdom. Amazing.

Question: where do you draw the line at considering others as better than yourself? I mean, if you're a forklift operator, you probably wouldn't consider an unskilled, untrained person to be better at you than driving a forklift. Someone could get killed. Obviously this isn't an across-the-board deal.

What other Biblical instructions and principles guide your actions and decisions where this is concerned? And does Biblical instruction really guide your actions, or do you just talk like it does?

5 comments:

Tony M said...

Yep, I know you're being facetious about the forklift operator, but obviously it doesn't mean (nor say) "better at something, just better. As in, more worthy, worthwhile, deserving, etc. And I don't think we should draw any lines in this regard. Not saying I don't, or that I'm even particularly good at doing it at all.

Tony M said...

(Yes, I realize I forgot to close my quote. Sorry about that.)

Dean Lusk said...

I was going for some make-the-Bible-say-what-it-doesn't-quite-say action there. :-) I found myself in a situation yesterday that made this line blurry, though. I'll write about it tomorrow, I think. It showcases my absent-mindedness.

Carolyn said...

another biblical guide that helps me to see when someone is better than me at something is "take the plank out of your own eye before you point out the splinter in someone else's eye." When I can remember to not look at someone with criticism, I can see past my own fears of not weighing up to their judgment of me.

Dean Lusk said...

Carolyn, I really like that last statement:

"When I can remember to not look at someone with criticism, I can see past my own fears of not weighing up to their judgment of me."

Good stuff! Hard to think that way sometimes.

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